Real or fake, you be the judge

“This is the sunset at the North Pole with the moon at its closest point last week.
A scene you will probably never get to see in person, so take a moment and enjoy God at work at the North Pole.

And, you also see the sun below the moon .

An amazing photo and not one easily duplicated. You may want To pass it on to others so they can enjoy it.”

My mother sent me a chain email with this beautiful photograph. My first impression was “Wow, that’s an amazing photo” but giving it another look it gave me that Photoshop feeling. It is possible that the Moon was put there and the reflection ring at the bottom was too distorted to be real. You be the judge. Please feel free to leave your comments or vote on the poll.

The Photograph doesn’t have a name attached to it so unfortunately I have no idea who took it.

This Post Has 3 Comments

  1. Fake. Any light we ever see on the moon is from the sun. The sun is farther away from the earth than the moon. Any part of the moon that we would see from this angle with the sun located where it is, would be dark, however in this photo, we see light on part of the moon that is visible to us, and couldn't possibly be getting light from the sun, there for a fake.Also, what mountains are at the North Pole? The polar region is just sea. The moon travels closer to the Equator, not the poles. What lens was used? Even with a telescope, you'd have to be shooting the moon from the base of Everest to get the moon this big with mountains in the photo. And at what f-stop? f/128?Is the dark part of the moon ever the same color and tone as the clear sky as it is in this photo? I don't think so.

  2. Fake. Any light we ever see on the moon is from the sun. The sun is farther away from the earth than the moon. Any part of the moon that we would see from this angle with the sun located where it is, would be dark, however in this photo, we see light on part of the moon that is visible to us, and couldn't possibly be getting light from the sun, there for a fake.
    Also, what mountains are at the North Pole? The polar region is just sea.
    The moon travels closer to the Equator, not the poles. What lens was used? Even with a telescope, you'd have to be shooting the moon from the base of Everest to get the moon this big with mountains in the photo. And at what f-stop? f/128?
    Is the dark part of the moon ever the same color and tone as the clear sky as it is in this photo? I don't think so.

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