Color Blind Photographer Shout Out

Back in February I wrote about being a color blind photographer.  Just the other day Mike Panic wrote a similar post himself.

I also learned that awesome HDR photographer Brian Matiash is a color blind photographer.

So with that said, if you are a color blind photographer comment below with a link to your work.  I would love to see it.  Tell me how you have struggled and/or worked past your difficulties with color.  Please share as I have.  Don’t be shy.

Thanks for reading and happy shooting,

Scott

This Post Has 12 Comments

  1. I always appreciate when photographers bring the issue of Color Blindness to light. I am red/green color blind. I've failed all of the little bubble tests and routines mistake colors or just can't see others. It's something that I've just learned to live with to the point that I often forget about it entirely.It goes without saying that color is a fundamental element of photography (unless, of course, you are an exclusive B/W guy or gal). But you get my point. Almost without fail, the first question that I am asked after someone learns that I am color blind is, "Well, how do you shoot if you can't see the colors?"To this, I usually explain that it's not that I don't see the colors, per se. They are not invisible to me. I just don't decode them in my brain the same way that others do. No biggie. I see what I see. When I compose a shot, I work with the canvas and the paint that I have. The same holds true (perhaps more so) during Post. I routinely apply presets and actions that alter the look of my images. Sure, there are times when something looks too off (usually in the red or green space) and my wife or one of my friends will bring it to my attention. I always take feedback into consideration but usually, I process to taste. When it looks good to me, I am happy.I find that I rely heavily on other people for their eyes, as it is, when I am processing non-HDR shots (wait, huh?!) of people. I do tend to botch skin tones because I can't see certain hues/shades.It all boils down to the face that we're all in it for the love of photography. We offer up the best of what we can see and hope that it resonates with others. I do find a lot of comfort in these types of posts because it reminds me that there are extremely talented simpatico photographers out there who can relate to being asked a thousand times, "So how can you tell which is the green light and which is the red light?" :)Kudos for this, Scott.

  2. Thank you for sharing your story Brian. I am honored to be among such great color blind photographers in the world. We make do with what we are given and that is incredible!I also botch skin tones quite often. Not until it is proofed a second time is it caught.

  3. Scott,Fellow color blinded photog here. I am not a professional, although would love to get there one day, but being that I take photographs and am color blind, I thought I'd post. Quick funny story. Growing up, the cartoon Doug on Nickelodeon was always on; wow did I love that show. Whenever it would come up in discussion in elementary school, I would talk about the "green" character Skeeter. Kids would tell me over and over how he is BLUE. I didn't buy it. Before knowing I was colorblind, I took what I saw as fact; how could you not? I would argue about this with other kids over and over…I now realize I was wrong, haha.Anyway, just thought I'd raise my hand. I'm in the midst of my Project 365, which can be found here –> <a href="http://www.jpa365.com” target=”_blank”>www.jpa365.com. Take care.-Jesse

  4. Jesse, thanks for sharing that story. I did in fact laugh out loud. Things like that happen to me even to this day. Fortunately it's usually people who know me that correct me.Thanks again for sharing and awesome photos on your Project 365!

    1. Hi Scott. Just read your post. I was researching color blindness on line for a book I’m writing about color blindness. First of all, let me say that you guys who are in the business. Keep it up. I am colorblind of the red/green variety and have worked in the electronics industry all my life. Nobody ever knew the difference unless i told them. let me clear up some misconceptions about the matter. If you are colorblind, then you see only shades of gray and black and white. That’s a fact. The problem with this term is that fellows like you and me are grouped in with this lot. We are actually color deficient. if you are like me then the traffic light is of course white. I share your pain. the book i am writing will clear up all the misconceptions for you and me and others. It wont contain very many technical terms and i have included all the experiences i have encountered in my life. By the way. If you see blue and purple as just two shades of blue then you have a loss of red cones in your eyes. Purple is a combination of blue and red. Got any questions? Send me an e-mail.—JOE

  5. Thank you for sharing your story Brian. I am honored to be among such great color blind photographers in the world. We make do with what we are given and that is incredible!I also botch skin tones quite often. Not until it is proofed a second time is it caught.

  6. Scott,Fellow color blinded photog here. I am not a professional, although would love to get there one day, but being that I take photographs and am color blind, I thought I'd post. Quick funny story. Growing up, the cartoon Doug on Nickelodeon was always on; wow did I love that show. Whenever it would come up in discussion in elementary school, I would talk about the "green" character Skeeter. Kids would tell me over and over how he is BLUE. I didn't buy it. Before knowing I was colorblind, I took what I saw as fact; how could you not? I would argue about this with other kids over and over…I now realize I was wrong, haha.Anyway, just thought I'd raise my hand. I'm in the midst of my Project 365, which can be found here –> <a href="http://www.jpa365.com” target=”_blank”>www.jpa365.com. Take care.-Jesse

  7. Jesse, thanks for sharing that story. I did in fact laugh out loud. Things like that happen to me even to this day. Fortunately it's usually people who know me that correct me.Thanks again for sharing and awesome photos on your Project 365!

  8. Hi My name is Alan and I am also a colour blind photographer, wwwalanmartinphotography.com. I dont really know to wht exteent but I know I am as I went through a Bubble test and fluncked it. I would love to hear from others what they think of my photos. I in return would give my perception of others photos. I~ think my photos before post prod are flat and not much colour saturation, ( I shoot in raw ) then I give it some contrast, set the colour balance, maybe a little vibrance, ( try not to mess too much). I use Lightroom for all post stuff but cant afford the full one. I use a canon 450d and have a 550d coming, 28-135 and a 70-200 f4l non is. I tried to buy a canon 5d mk2 off ebay seemed a bargain at 1100 but the git stung me, but thats another story. I just have an insatiable craving to take photos “especially of women” everyone says they are good but I think they are c**p. Ps website still working on it and the private gallery user/pass is user/shirly.

  9. thanks for sharing all the stories. feels good to know there are others like me out there…doing it anyway.

    many many thanks. this keeps me motivated on “those days” where you second guess whether or not there is a sustainable future in it. wondering if you’re going down the right path.

    M

    http://www.marcusubungen.com

  10. I think it takes a color blind photographer to think that HDR looks good. BAZINGA! …i kid, i kid…

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